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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
the depth and length of this weak economy. in some ways the strongest argument for obama to replace him is a partisan argument. there have been republicans in this job now for more than 20 years. and i think democrats may not want the fed chairman job to be something that is seen as a republican job. now, bernanke is, of course, being criticized much more by republicans than democrats will at this point but he still is originally a republican, there are some, geithner, and summers, and including in blinder who would be serious candidates if persh key were to leave. >> rose: your thought, sir? the scuttlebutt from everybody is that he'll probably have snuff after eight years. i do believe that if he wants a third term and he asked the president for it, he'd probably get it for the reasons david said. he's done a very good-- never mind personal, never mind republican. he's just done a very good job. as david said, he's got republicans a lot angrier than teams, even though he came into this job as a bush appointee from the republican side. so i think if bernanke is an eight-year chairman,
and chemical weapons. and also the bernanke conversation today about the economy and the role of the federal reserve when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the syrian conflict reached new levels this week. the assad regime and the syrian opposition groups accused of each other of using chemical weapons. the allegations were made only hours before president obama's departure to israel yesterday. the white house has yet to verify the claims but lawmakers are increasingly calling for action. here's what presidentbama said eaier day in a joint press conference with israeli prime minister netanyahu. >> with respect to chemical weapons, we intend to investigate thoroughly exactly what happened. obviously, in syria right now, you've got a war zone. you have information that's filtered out. but we have to make sure that we know exactly what happened, what was nature of the incident, what can we document, what can we prove. i've instructed me teams to work closely witll oer countries in the region, and internatio
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
stand? and israel's minister of the economy is here to answer our questions. >>> plus, mayor michael bloomberg called starbucks ceo ridiculi ridiculist. >>> and the head of colorado's department of corrections answers the door only to be shot down. we take you to the manhunt tonight. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight with friends like these, well, president obama arrived in israel to day. it was his first trip there as president. everything seemed rosey for a little while between him and benjamin netanyahu. >> and just as we have for these past 65 years, the united states is proudo stand with you as your strongest ally and your greatest friend. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. >> sounded so perfect. but then -- later in the day things changed. >> iran is a grave threat to israel, a grave threat to the world, a nuclear iran. the united states is committed to dealing with it. >> each country has to make its own decisi
own way. toyou can go to c-span.org check out "first ladies." spoke about the economy and monetary policy. you can see all of the news conference tonight a on c-span. , our policy has two main elements. first, we decided to continue purchasing mortgage-backed perrities at a pace of -- month. it bears to emphasize that the committee has described this program in terms of a monthly pace of purchases rather than a total amount of expected purchases. evolution of the program to economic criteria. within this framework, the committee can vary the pace of purchases. at this meeting, the committee judge -- second, the committee kept the target to the federal fund rate. it will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the purchase program ends and if the economic recovery strengthens. the low range for the fund rate will be appropriate as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6.5%. if economic conditions provided in the guidance are a threshold and not triggers, crossing one or more these marshaled will not automatically lead to an increase in rates. rather the committee will
care system is the largest economy in the world. we spend on health care more than the french spend on everything for 66 million people. >> of the three brothers, while he is the author of the book, he's not the one most people know from television, which doesn't mean he hasn't done television. >> here's zeke. zeke emanuel, a smart kid from harvard, now a yank at oxford. >> this was an early tv reality show called "now get out of that" which aired on the bbc in 1981. it was part intellectual challenge, part physical, obstacles, problem solving. and as you'll hear, it's not just zeke's chicago accent that sets him apart, it's how he throws himself into and at everything. >> but says you may not walk inside the area. >> that's what it says here, walk. >> later in the bog area -- >> hang on. >> it's not a top. it's a milk can or something. >> then in the water. >> this ain't no raft. where's the rubber dinghy. >> at 27 he shows physique and courage, but always leads with his brain. >> you have to hand it to zeke. he may be pushy, but where would they be without him? >> which brings us
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
. >> sreenivasan: the federal reserve stood by its aggressive plan to stimulate the u.s. economy, keeping short-term interest rates at record lows. and it said there are signs the economy is getting stronger. one of those signs-- unemployment-- fell to a four- year low of 7.7% in february. still, the fed predicted it won't reach 6.5% until 2015. the fed and its chairman, ben bernanke, also had words of caution for congress. >> i do believe that long-term fiscal stability is extremely important and i urge congress and the administration, as i always do when i go to testify, to do whatever is necessary to put us on a sustainable fiscal path going forward. but in doing so, i think it's a good idea to pay attention to the impacts in the near term on what is still not a completely satisfactory recovery. >> sreenivasan: congress moved a step closer to advancing a spending bill that would keep the federal government running through september. the senate passed the legislation this afternoon along bipartisan lines. the measure funds the day-to-day operating budgets of every cabinet agency, gives $87 bi
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the la
taxpayers. in 1990's president clinton worked with a republican congress to grow the economy and to restrain spending. in the 1990's, the balanced budget agreement actually resulted in a much faster balanced budget than anybody anticipated. balancing the budget was a major accomplishment for republicans in the 1990's, and also part of president clinton's legacy. i would hope that president obama would learn from that. the american people overwhelmingly support balancing our budgets. and the budget the senate democrats are considering never balances, ever. that means more debt, fewer jobs, and, frankly, much higher taxes from the american people. we certainly hope the president will change his mind and submit a plan that actually balances the budget. let's be clear, the democrats in this town who reject the goal of balancing the budget i think were out of step of where the american people are. the american people know you can't continue to spend money you don't have. i didn't come here for a fancy title or big office. i want to hand my kids and grandkids the same shot at the american dream th
see the economy take off mr. mr. norquist? >> guest: okay, we haven't had trillion dollars spending cuts that we had an agreement by the president of the united states forced on them by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars, so 100 million a year. they haven't started yet and they're just beginning to kick in. this a quest or is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decades to what the republicans want in the state battle we had in 2011, the budget control act was obama needs the debt ceiling to be increased because we spent so much money and republican said okay, we will raise the debt ceiling so the country doesn't default but only if you agree to a dollar for dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. that $2.5 trillion in spending restraints, not real cuts, spending, less than obama had hoped but in washington that is called a cut. if you want 10 of something and you only got eight of something, you walked away with eight but so that was the $2.5 trillion spending reduction over the next decade. it hasn't happened yet. we have sever
into the economy, until they see things change substantially. and what they're talking about in terms of substantial change is the unemployment rate going down to 6.5%. the federal reserve, they have regular meetings, they give regular statements on what they're going to do. today was one of those regular meetings that was scheduled. we were not expecting a change in rates. obviously with rates as low as they are, the only option will to be raise rates and you don't typically raise rates, wolf, unless you're trying to slow an economy down. if you raise rates, it makes it harder, more expensive for people to borrow money. they spend less. they borrow less. we're not at that point right now. so rates are staying exactly where they were, the federal reserve will continue to print and pump $85 billion into the economy. the way they do that, wolf, is they buy bonds back from banks, treasuries and mortgage-backed securities that gives banks more money to lend to businesses, and individuals for their mortgages or for their business expansion, and that puts more money into the economy. they'r
with a republican congress to grow the economy and restrain spending. result7 agreement unnamed much faster balanced budget than anybody anticipated. balancing the budget was a major accomplishment for republicans and part of president clinton's legacy. i would hope that president obama would learn from that. the american people support balancing our budgets, and the budgets that democrats are considering never balances, ever. that means more debt, fewer jobs, and much higher taxes from the american people. we hope the president will change his mind and submit a plan that balances the budget. let's be clear, democrats in this town who reject the goal of balancing the budget are out of step. the american people know you cannot continue to spend money you do not have. i did not come here for a federal tight -- fancy title. i want to hand my kids and grandkids the same shot at the american dream that i had, not some mountain of debt. that is why republicans are working to balance the federal budget. been talk about the budget here. thatu think budgets -- they are essentially political weapons -- [indis
on the global economy. particularly in asia. every adjourning area next to iran is susceptible to a local war which used to be called people's war. passivelyus to be friendly, expecting soviet reactions. likelyasked what is the soviet reaction by the president of the united states? they may state border incidents, we have had lots of them. then he says they may invade us from mongolia where they have 22 armored divisions and strike southward towards beijing directly. he says we will use people's war, and i know what he meant. the kind of things we experienced also. people's wars do not end quickly. we are not going to kill all iranians. inn if they do these things the region. the protracted conflict will make this experience a bit -- make this experience of a decade ago seemed like a trifle. therefore i am worried by we are trying to buy off this pressure the president is feeling for commitments to military action against iran without fully contemplating the large scale geopolitical consequences, the affect a effectthe this -- the that we will be alone in this adventure have no illusions. eve
: without knowing the structure of the new bedford economy, it is experiencing what a lot of people are experiencing. depending on the industries, you are a winner or loser depending on the structure of your economy. places that are strong in are growing.ces information sector, utilities. these are areas that have not been growing. host: talk about new england. aest: i grew up outside of town in massachusetts. it has similarities to new bedford. .bout 100,000 people strong industrial heritage. it redefined and re-scope itself successfully over the last couple of decades. massachusetts recognizes that its older cities have these challenges. and i go home to visit, there have been efforts to revitalize the older cities. they have lots of charms. new bedford has a wonderful whaling history. has worked atry sincetizens -- census 1997. we are looking at population changes. our other guest is lisa sturtevant with guest: richey-- where mason university she is a p deputy analysis. let's hear from bob, south dakota, rural. caller: i have some comments. [indiscernible] we should look at our
america's case on a daily basis because he would be's with the economy. so one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state because she knew she could do that for him on a daily basis around the world. that's why i think that she would bring to him accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward in terms of agreement, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him the -- what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decision. libya being one of them, and asia definitely. >> host: we'll get to libya next. a very interesting scenario and what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 and she spoke there and she said farflung destinations from the chronic where she would be traveling, that issue would come up as the first, second, or third issue, and it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusing on this far-flung destination, and once we saw wikilea
politics a long time and the kind of performance in the recent years with the economy. everybody is frustrated. that is the good news scenario. the bad news scenario we literally fix it and we relive 2008. >> can i ask a question as conservatives especially focus on the issue of deficit and what we are going to do about it and it becomes a rallying cry. where was that rhetoric when we were involved in two wars and paying for them on a credit card and having two major tax cuts put in place? iraq war is one of the first wars we haven't had a war tax. where was that fiscal responsibility a decade ago? >> missing. and i'm the wrong person to ask this. because i said famously in budget circles. it's a big crowd. in three the party is over, people get it and not spend any more money and ten years later, i was dead wrong. we lost our rudder somewhere. that's something that america actually stuck to and lived by and served america well 200 years. since then we have developed big problems. >> i also illusion the war would pay for itself and be resolved within six months and up and running
. let me turn to this second point. the war has affected the economy as well and left us with a legacy of higher oil prices and much higher national debt to. the iraq war costs set off a chain of events that had high reaching consequences. i was speaking about budgetary costs, but there are vast costs into civil society, here and in iraq, economic costs and financial costs, and some of those costs are borne by individual society or society at byge rather than directly the government. there were many of these costs i can talk about, but let me highlight a couple. if we think back to when we invaded iraq in 2003, oil prices to order $50 a barrel. and the markets including china and india predicted those would remain in that range for the next decade. oil prices are complicated, but most agree that iraq was one of the triggers of lead to oil prices shooting up shortly after the invasion. oil prices peaked do you since then we have rarely seen oil prices below the level of $100. if jo stieglitz were here, he would argue very strongly that we need to connect the dots, that oil prices contri
that at least portions of the economy will be saved. >> let's take you now to brussels and speak to al-jazeera's harry smith. the finance ministers are likely to discuss this possible deal on sunday in >> i must say it's interesting to hear what he had to say. word hasn't reached us yet. it may have reached the bureaucrats in the building behind us. the lights are still on and talks have been talk dunk taking place behind closed doorkss as jonah said. e know there's been a lot of conferencing and video conferencing between the troika, the -- and the last we heard was that there is still confirmation that meetings will take place here tomorrow, sunday, but meetings are scheduled and i think the fact that they were scheduled and scheduled some days in advance suggests that there was a degree of optimism even if there is no public display of optimism and there was a degree of optimism that some sort of deal would be made and we know it has to be made by monday. at's the date by which the european confirmation that meet will central banks' drip-drip of funding to cyprus would cease. so wha
democracy. it will soon be one of the world's largest economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and increase foreign direct investment, reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all live in the is ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. since asia's economy is largely based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms, to liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is out in the anchors itself in the asia-pacific region, and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.-india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve. it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the vat is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with ind
, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential to the prediction of weather, navigation in all forms of transportation, the operation of power grids, the completion of local and global financial transactions and communication to mobile platforms whether they be on land, sea or air. commercial satellite industry also plays a critical role in supporting government operations. commercial satellites supply the majority of communications in afghanistan and iraq. today our satellites are still flying almost all of the dod's unmanned aerial vehicles, and we're providing the vast majority of the navy's communications at sea. to address the challenges that i mentioned earlier, the leading space operation, operators have gotten together on a number of complex cooperative projects, probably the most significant of these is the space data association or sda. the formation o
economy. >> americans were according to polls, americans are strongly in favor of gun can control. recent poll, favor background checks. more than half favor banning assault weapons. over half favor banning large magazines. >> that's the reason i think the president is glad to be away from washington, away from congress. there is a level of dysfunction here. the power in this institution is enormous. it takes away from common sense steps. you have the filibuster. and senator reid felt, as he counted votes, he wouldn't be able to keep the assault ban weapon in the bill and in the house, majority rules. that's mr. boehner. and it is up to him whether he puts legislation on the floor. now the other dynamic we have is that the country is in favor of it. but in the a lot of these districts, the folks who represent those districts, those people are solidly against it. so you have this situation where the minority, with this gerrymandering actually is vetoing what in effect is i think why the popular efforts common sense steps on guns. >> congressman, i think if it were widely popular, you would
china and its economy, and the deals it has cut in countries such as iran, pakistan, etc., you will see that probably is true. page of "thent washington times" yesterday is how china is the largest exporter of weapons. is that a direct link to what happened? guest: i think if you look at how china has positioned itself -- and they have every right to. we are the ones who i think made a strategic error. but if you look at how china has positioned itself economically to take advantage of what is coming out of all this chaos -- afghanistan as wl, pakistan as well. pakistan considers china it's number one friend. strongeru lk at the assertion in east asia of influence, you can see how china has benefited. our office was the leading proponent of what became known as the pivot to east asia while i was in the senate. i spent a lot of time in east -- and weefocused focused as much as we could on strengthening relations with japan, korea, vietnam, singapore, and changing the formula in burma and i led the first delegation into burma in 10 years or it -- in 10 years. by going into iraq the way we
the recession that follows on as they try and make the economy back on track. this was done because some european countries believed to be the fins and germans and other northern european countries wanted to make sure they were not seen as bailing out rich russian who have accounts in cyprus. or indeed they now felt that people had to pay their part of the pain. but it was not done in ireland. it was not done in portugal. it was not done in greece. and with the prospect of possibility of spain and italy, you can see -- i cannot find, michael and suzanne, i cannot find one economist or banker that i've spoken to today that says this was a good idea. everybody agrees it was a pretty awful policy. >> let's bring in alison. i want you to weigh-in on the conversation here. we're looking at the u.s. markets. looks like it's down by eight points or so. what is the impact do you think in the united states? >> it's actually come back a long way, hasn't it? >> michael, it really has. you saw the knee-jerk reaction right when the bell opened the dow dropped as much as 110 points. obviously it's com
skidding by in this tough economy. >> keith ellison, thank you very much for coming in. >> thank you. >> democratic congressman from minnesota. >>> up next, a surprise for president obama. what our latest poll shows about his job approval. >>> then, an insider from the bush white house is spilling the beans about the march to war in iraq ten years ago. the former bush speech writer is here live. zap technology. arrival. with hertz gold plus rewards, you skip the counters, the lines, and the paperwork. zap. it's our fastest and easiest way to get you into your car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on his portfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> if there was ever a second term honeymoon, it looks like it's over. president obama's j
the world and make america's case on a daily basis because he was going to be busy at home with the economy. so there was a very clear reason why he -- one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state, because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all around the world. and that's why i think that she would bring to him an accurate reading of where things stood, what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, in terms of agreement, in terms of where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him, you know, what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles, but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them and asia, definitely. >> host: uh-huh, and we'll get to libya next, actually, i find that a -- it was a or very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli/palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 when hillary clinton spoke at the conference, and she mentioned at the time something that i thought was interesting. she said that far-flung
. >> the muslim brotherhood needs us. i mean their economy is going to hell. they have got a real problems. they need imf financing. so we need to engage with them but we also need to stand on our principleses. >> rose: whatever happened to the idea expressed at this table that in an interesting way the responsibility of governing might make islamist parties change. they would face a new reality and that therefore theyould uderstand more than they did when they were outside of power, what it meant. and they would make different choices. >> the answer is that there is no universal-- there is no universal answer for this. because asian is lam with countrieses like indonesia and malaysia is one thing. turkey is another, hezbollah and lebanon, egypt, i agree is yet another so there is not one formula. islam is dirse and it will vary from one country to the other. in some countries, islam is in time will become a pragmatic. in other countries, it would be an ongoing revolution, radicallization. >> we have not been clear enough, john kerry has done this on his last trip but we need to be more cl
and now cyprus? >> it's a little tiny island economy that it really, i mean the dow was whipsawed yesterday in this country because we're watching what happens there. all of these cracks in europe very important to the u.s. stock futures right now are up. dow futures are up 30 points. this tiny country bears watching this morning. the problem is going to sound familiar to you. if cyprus doesn't get a bailout, it could go bankrupt, exit the euro-zone and lead to financial instability at exactly the wrong time for the world economy. the plan to fix the problems there include slapping a fee on bank deposits in the country. we complain about bank fees here. this is one major bank fee. they voted this bank fee down and now a bailout of the country is in jeopardy. here's what they were thinking of. if you get a bank account with $129,000, you would have been taxed $8,700, gone. taken right out of your account just like that. the people in cyprus protested and rushed to withdraw their money. look at the protest lines at the banks. any bailout needs to come with strings attached and the r
pakistan leadership struggled with the sinking economy islamic extremist faxes and tensions over drone strikes. >>> mayors against gun violence tellased $12 million in television ad time. the ads airing in 13 key states across the country that the group thinks are divided on gun control. making an appearance on meet the press mayor bloomberg said he has plenty of support. >> this is about the public wanting to be safe on their streets and the public having the right to buy arms and the right to protect themselves and the right to use them for sport, for hunting, but also it is about the public's right to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and the mentally ill. that is in everybody's interest. >> shannon: the comments from mayor bloomberg come as the debate over gun control continues here in washington. earlier this week, senate majority leader harry reid removed an assault weapons ban from the gun control bill he plans to offer saying he didn't have the votes to get it passed. republican senator tom coburn says he doesn't believe the focus should be on keeping guns from law abidin
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)